Ask a doctor: “Is it okay to take someone else’s prescription medication?” »

Join Fox News to access this content

Plus special access to selected articles and other premium content with your account – for free.

By entering your email address and pressing Continue, you agree to the Fox News Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, which includes our Financial Incentive Notice.

Please enter a valid email address.

Most of us have, at one time or another, asked a friend or family member over-the-counter medication to treat a headache or stomach ache, as the dosage and instructions are quite universal.

But is the same protocol appropriate when it comes to taking someone else’s prescription medications?

The categorical answer from doctors is a resounding “no.”

MEDICINE CABINET ESSENTIALS: 9 ESSENTIALS EVERY HOUSEHOLD SHOULD HAVE ON HAND

There are specific reasons for this.

“Taking someone else’s prescribed medication can be very harmful,” LaTasha Perkins, MD, a family medicine physician at Medstar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC, told Fox News Digital.

Doctors agreed that sharing prescription medications with others was a bad idea. (iStock)

“You should only take your own medications and not anyone else’s, because there is a lot to do to understand them.”

Many considerations go into prescribing medication to a patient, Perkins said, including healthmedical history and blood tests – which can be completely different from person to person.

Even if you take the same medication as someone else, they may receive a different dose, the doctor noted.

ARE YOU TRAVELING INTERNATIONALLY? IT MIGHT BE ILLEGAL TO BRING THESE MEDICATIONS, PHARMACIST SAYS

“Many medications also look the same, so you should take what has been specifically prescribed for you,” she cautioned.

Many factors go into prescribing a medication to a patient, including healthmedical history and blood tests, according to doctors. (iStock)

Drug interactions present another concern.

“If you are taking vitamins or any other medication that may interact with a prescription medication, this should be taken into account when adjusting your prescription,” Perkins said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Allergies are yet another key factor, the doctor warns, because some people are allergic to additives contained in medicines.

“There is a reason the medicine is prescribed: it is personalized for each individual based on various parameters. health factors” Perkins said.

The consequences of sharing prescription medications – which is never a good idea – can range from serious allergic reactions to drug interactions and overdose, a doctor has warned. (iStock)

Chad Weston, MD, a physician at Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine & Practical Care – Brunswick in Shallotte, North Carolina, agreed that taking a medication prescribed to a different person, even for seemingly similar symptoms, can be harmful and have unintended effects…

Read Complete News ➤

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ten − 5 =